Palestine Travel Guide

Palestine Tourism:
Palestine Tourist Attractions
Tabriz
Jifna
Hebron Glass
Odessa
Damascus
History of Haifa
Narrow Gauge Railway
Jezreel Valley railway
Khirbat Jiddin
Sea of Galilee
Kawkab al-Hawa
Palestinian Cuisine
Al-Khader
Jaffa
Natal, Rio Grande do Norte


Palestine Directory & Palestine Travel Information

Palestine History:
Paleolithic & Neolithic Periods
Chalcolithic Period & Bronze Age
Iron Age
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Period
Persian Rule

Classical Antiquity:
Hellenistic Rule
Hasmonean Dynasty
Roman Rule
Byzantine Rule
Islamic Period
Arab Caliphate Rule
Umayyad Rule
A Bbasid Rule
Fatimid Rule
Crusader Rule
Mamluk Rule
Ottoman Rule
Egyptian Rule
Ottoman Rule (1841-1917)
20th Century - British Mandate
Infrastructure and Development

1936-1939 Arab Revolt in Palestine
World War II and Palestine
End of the British Mandate 1945-1948

UN partition and the 1948 Palestine War
Current Status

Palestine Origin of Name
Palestine Boundaries
Additional Extrabiblical References
Palestine Biblical Texts

Palestine Demographics:
Early Demographics
Demographics in the late Ottoman & the British Mandate Periods
Official Reports
Current Demographics


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Palestine Travel Guide

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Palestine History - Current Status

On the same day that the State of Israel was announced, the Arab League announced that it would set up a single Arab civil administration throughout Palestine. The All-Palestine government was declared in Gaza on 1 October 1948, partly as an Arab League move to limit the influence of Transjordan over the Palestinian issue. The former mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini, was appointed as president. The government was recognised by Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen, but not by Transjordan or any non-Arab country. It was little more than an Egyptian protectorate and had negligible influence or funding. Following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the area allocated to the Palestinian Arabs and the international zone of Jerusalem were occupied by Israel and the neighboring Arab states in accordance with the terms of the 1949 Armistice Agreements. Palestinian Arabs living in the Gaza Strip or Egypt were issued with All-Palestine passports until 1959, when Gamal Abdul Nasser, president of Egypt, issued a decree that annulled the All-Palestine government.

In addition to the UN-partitioned area allotted to the Jewish state, Israel captured and incorporated[citation needed]a further 26% of the Mandate territory. Jordan captured and annexed about 21% of the Mandate territory, which it referred to as the West Bank. Jerusalem was divided, with Jordan taking the eastern parts, including the Old City, and Israel taking the western parts. The Gaza Strip was captured by Egypt. In addition, Syria held on to small slivers of Mandate territory to the south and east of the Sea of Galilee, which had been allocated in the UN partition plan to the Jewish state.

For a description of the massive population movements, Arab and Jewish, at the time of the 1948 war and over the following decades, see Palestinian exodus and Jewish exodus from Arab lands.

In the course of the Six Day War in June 1967, Israel captured the West Bank from Jordan and the Gaza Strip from Egypt.

From the 1960s onward, the term "Palestine" was regularly used in political contexts. Various declarations, such as the 15 November 1988 proclamation of a State of Palestine by the PLO referred to a country called Palestine, defining its borders based on the U.N. Resolution 242 and 383 and the principle of land for peace. The Green Line was the pre-1967 border established by many UN resolutions including those mentioned above.

According to the CIA World Factbook, of the ten million people living between Jordan and the Mediterranean Sea, about five million identify as Palestinian, Arab, Bedouin and/or Druze. One million of those are citizens of Israel. The other four million are residents of the West Bank and Gaza, which are under the jurisdiction of the Palestinian National Authority, which was formed in 1994, pursuant to the Oslo Accords.

In the West Bank, 360,000 Israelis have settled in a hundred scattered new towns and settlements with connecting corridors. The 2.5 million West Bank Palestinians live primarily in four blocs centered in Hebron, Ramallah, Nablus, and Jericho. In 2005, Israel withdrew its army and all the Israeli settlers were evacuated from the Gaza Strip, in keeping with Ariel Sharon's plan for unilateral disengagement, and control over the area was transferred to the Palestinian Authority.

The Palestine Liberation Organization has enjoyed status as a non-member observer at the United Nations since 1974, and continues to represent "Palestine" there. After the 1988 declaration of state, the State of Palestine was formally recognized by 117 United Nations member states. Many countries, including the United States and members states of the EU, have diplomatic ties with the Palestinian Authority, and have recognized the Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza as a "Country" for legal, economic, and political purposes. Dozens of other States have gone one step further and legally recognized that same national entity as the "State of Palestine". There have also been published reports of Israelis who have accepted Palestinian citizenship and passports. Palestine is also represented at international sporting events, like the Olympics and Paralympics and films from Palestine have won awards at international cinema events, like the Oscars.


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Palestine Travel Informations and Jordan Travel Guide
Palestine Origin of Name - Palestine Boundaries - Additional Extrabiblical References - Palestine Biblical Texts

Palestine History: Paleolithic & Neolithic Periods - Chalcolithic Period & Bronze Age - Iron Age
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Period - Persian Rule
Classical Antiquity: Hellenistic Rule - Hasmonean Dynasty - Roman Rule - Byzantine Rule
Islamic Period - Arab Caliphate Rule - Umayyad Rule - A Bbasid Rule - Fatimid Rule - Crusader Rule - Mamluk Rule
Ottoman Rule - Egyptian Rule - Ottoman Rule (1841-1917) - 20th Century - British Mandate
Infrastructure and development
- 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine - World War II and Palestine
End of the British Mandate 1945-1948
- UN partition and the 1948 Palestine War - Current Status

Palestine Demographics: Early Demographics - Demographics in the late Ottoman & the British Mandate Periods
Official reports - Current Demographics

Palestine Tourism
Palestine Tourist Attractions: Tabriz - Jifna - Hebron glass - Odessa - Damascus - History of Haifa - Narrow Gauge Railway
Jezreel Valley railway - Khirbat Jiddin - Sea of Galilee - Kawkab al-Hawa - Palestinian Cuisine - Al-Khader - Jaffa
Natal, Rio Grande do Norte

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