Palestine Travel Guide

Palestine Tourism:
Palestine Tourist Attractions
Tabriz
Jifna
Hebron Glass
Odessa
Damascus
History of Haifa
Narrow Gauge Railway
Jezreel Valley railway
Khirbat Jiddin
Sea of Galilee
Kawkab al-Hawa
Palestinian Cuisine
Al-Khader
Jaffa
Natal, Rio Grande do Norte


Palestine Directory & Palestine Travel Information

Palestine History:
Paleolithic & Neolithic Periods
Chalcolithic Period & Bronze Age
Iron Age
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Period
Persian Rule

Classical Antiquity:
Hellenistic Rule
Hasmonean Dynasty
Roman Rule
Byzantine Rule
Islamic Period
Arab Caliphate Rule
Umayyad Rule
A Bbasid Rule
Fatimid Rule
Crusader Rule
Mamluk Rule
Ottoman Rule
Egyptian Rule
Ottoman Rule (1841-1917)
20th Century - British Mandate
Infrastructure and Development

1936-1939 Arab Revolt in Palestine
World War II and Palestine
End of the British Mandate 1945-1948

UN partition and the 1948 Palestine War
Current Status

Palestine Origin of Name
Palestine Boundaries
Additional Extrabiblical References
Palestine Biblical Texts

Palestine Demographics:
Early Demographics
Demographics in the late Ottoman & the British Mandate Periods
Official Reports
Current Demographics


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Palestine Travel Guide

Palestine Holiday Vacation Trips offers travel tips and information for top travel places and best destinations. We feature links, resources and large selection of budget airlines, chartered planes, sea cruises, ferries, travel agencies, land transports and attractions including beaches, medical tourism, retirement homes, historical and pilgrimage tours.


Palestine History - Islamic Period - Ottoman Rule (1841-1917)

In the reorganisation of 1873, which established the administrative boundaries that remained in place until 1914, Palestine was split between three major administrative units. The northern part, above a line connecting Jaffa to north Jericho and the Jordan, was assigned to the vilayet of Beirut, subdivided into the sanjaks of Acre, Beirut and Nablus. The southern part, from Jaffa downwards, was part of the special district of Jerusalem. Its southern boundaries were unclear but petered out in the eastern Sinai Peninsula and northern Negev Desert. Most of the central and southern Negev was assigned to the wilayet of Hijaz, which also included the Sinai Peninsula and the western part of Arabia.

Nonetheless, the old name remained in popular and semi-official use. Many examples of its usage in the 16th and 17th centuries have survived During the 19th century, the Ottoman Government employed the term Ardh-u Filistin in official correspondence, meaning for all intents and purposes the area to the west of the River Jordan which became 'Palestine' under the British in 1922". However, the Ottomans regarded "Palestine" as an abstract description of a general region but not as a specific administrative unit with clearly defined borders. This meant that they did not consistently apply the name to a clearly defined area. Ottoman court records, for instance, used the term to describe a geographical area that did not include the sanjaks of Jerusalem, Hebron and Nablus, although these had certainly been part of historical Palestine. Amongst the educated Arab public, Filastin was a common concept, referring either to the whole of Palestine or to the Jerusalem sanjak alone or just to the area around Ramle.

The end of the 19th century saw the beginning of Zionist immigration. The "First Aliyah" was the first modern widespread wave of Zionist aliyah. Jews who migrated to Palestine in this wave came mostly from Eastern Europe and from Yemen. This wave of aliyah began in 1881–82 and lasted until 1903. An estimated 25,000–35,000 Jews immigrated during the First Aliyah. The First Aliyah laid the cornerstone for Jewish settlement in Israel and created several settlements such as Rishon LeZion, Rosh Pina, Zikhron Ya'aqov and Gedera.

The "Second Aliyah" took place between 1904 and 1914, during which approximately 40,000 Jews immigrated, mostly from Russia and Poland, and some from Yemen. The Second Aliyah immigrants were primarily idealists, inspired by the revolutionary ideals then sweeping the Russian Empire who sought to create a communal agricultural settlement system in Palestine. They thus founded the kibbutz movement. The first kibbutz, Degania, was founded in 1909. Tel Aviv was founded at that time, though its founders were not necessarily from the new immigrants. The Second Aliyah is largely credited with the Revival of the Hebrew language and establishing it as the standard language for Jews in Israel. Eliezer Ben-Yehuda contributed to the creation of the first modern Hebrew dictionary. Although he was an immigrant of the First Aliyah, his work mostly bore fruit during the second.

Ottoman rule over the eastern Mediterranean lasted until World War I when the Ottomans sided with Germany and the Central Powers. During World War I, the Ottomans were driven from much of the region by the British Empire during the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire.


Holiday Vacation Trips Palestine also showcase a unique blend of travel and leisure photos and stories, updates, events and announcements about roads, shopping malls, hotels, bed and breakfast, restaurants, groceries and more. Not just a travel guide but one-of-a-kind discovery of people and places.

Palestine Travel Informations and Jordan Travel Guide
Palestine Origin of Name - Palestine Boundaries - Additional Extrabiblical References - Palestine Biblical Texts

Palestine History: Paleolithic & Neolithic Periods - Chalcolithic Period & Bronze Age - Iron Age
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Period - Persian Rule
Classical Antiquity: Hellenistic Rule - Hasmonean Dynasty - Roman Rule - Byzantine Rule
Islamic Period - Arab Caliphate Rule - Umayyad Rule - A Bbasid Rule - Fatimid Rule - Crusader Rule - Mamluk Rule
Ottoman Rule - Egyptian Rule - Ottoman Rule (1841-1917) - 20th Century - British Mandate
Infrastructure and development
- 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine - World War II and Palestine
End of the British Mandate 1945-1948
- UN partition and the 1948 Palestine War - Current Status

Palestine Demographics: Early Demographics - Demographics in the late Ottoman & the British Mandate Periods
Official reports - Current Demographics

Palestine Tourism
Palestine Tourist Attractions: Tabriz - Jifna - Hebron glass - Odessa - Damascus - History of Haifa - Narrow Gauge Railway
Jezreel Valley railway - Khirbat Jiddin - Sea of Galilee - Kawkab al-Hawa - Palestinian Cuisine - Al-Khader - Jaffa
Natal, Rio Grande do Norte

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